92 and still driving…

This blog is written by Matthew Wiebe. Matt, is a Fall 2018 student from Cedarville University. Editor’s note: This post has been edited.

Seniors, are just like anyone else! They can be awesome and also not so awesome.

Luckily, the seniors at Citipointe Seniors are fantastic. These seniors, while they may be old, are young at heart. These are not the grumpy old seniors who sit around and do nothing. One lady is 92 and still drives.

Seniors at a picnic

They are very active and engaging and genuinely want you to be there. They love talking to students and asking students questions about home life in the States.

The seniors really love when you ask them questions and engage with their lives. They want to tell you their experiences. My time at Citipointe Seniors has been nothing but fun and brilliant. I’ve really enjoyed the fellowship I had with the seniors through chats, drinking coffee, day trips to Bribie island or playing bowls! All of it was lots of fun.

Regular morning tea at Citipointe Seniors

Our weekly morning tea at Citipointe Seniors

I’ve have been fortunate of having my grandparents live with me for three years. This definitely made engaging with the seniors much simpler because I’ve been doing it for years. It also helps that the seniors at Citipointe see you as one of their grandchildren, so it’ll be no different for you to interact with these seniors then your grandparents.

Three people in a group

Jessica Gurrola from Biola University with Citipointe Seniors coordinators Anne & Stuart at the Toowoomba Flower Festival

If you haven’t been around your grandparents much, then this volunteer service might seem a bit scary. Never fear because you don’t need to try. You simply need to be there, and engagement will happen. It’ll probably take a couple days to feel fully comfortable. Once that mark is hit, then the rest of the time there will be amazing.

Service Placements are part of
The View of Australia Class (AS 200).
Find out more about the unit!

“… wherever two or three come together in honor of my name, I am right there with them”

This blog is written by Susan Leonard a local CHC student. Susan and other Australian students participated in the Australian Indigenous Worldviews (CS254) class, along with ASC students in semester two, 2018. Editor’s note: This post has been edited.

Traditional Welcome to Country ceremony

In August this year, my Australian Indigenous Worldviews class took a trip away to  Minjerribah (Aboriginal name for North Stradbroke Island). The knowledge and the experience profoundly changed my perspective and my attitude towards Australian Indigenous people and their way of life.

CHC students (left to right): Sophie, Georgia , Susan (me), Billie & Alison after getting our faces painted

Georgia having her face painted by an Aboriginal elder

I have asked myself, at which point did the empathy come. Upon reflection, there was a profound moment when we worshiped together on the shores of Brown Lake.  In Matthew 18:20 (The Passion Translation) tells us that “… wherever two or three come together in honor of my name, I am right there with them”.  I could not stop the tears from coming when I heard Lea (our Indigenous lecturer) share how her ancestors had sat in that same place.  There, in the presence of the Holy Spirit, it all became real for me.

Local elder Matty with ASC Indigenous lecturer Lea

However, it was not just that moment that changed my understanding.  It was a culmination of lessons and readings, throwing boomerangs and spears, learning about bush tucker (food), having my face decorated, participating in ceremonial dances, creating sand art on the beach, being ‘in country’, hearing the hearts of the amazing brothers and sisters we met, and the revelation of the Holy Spirit.

CHC student Ben learning to throw a spear

Having fun with sand art on the beach

Having fun with ASC students (left to right): Julia from Dordt College and Katie from John Brown University, Susan (me) making sand art

Despite the horrors Aboriginal people and their ancestors have endured and with racism still prevalent in Australian society, the elders were still open in sharing from their heart about their culture. The Aboriginal elders clearly demonstrated reconciliation and the healing we ALL so desperately need. This experience gave me, not only understanding, but a sense of belonging.

Being part of community

My joy in all of this comes from the knowledge that out of great pain and suffering God, our Jehovah-Rapha, will bring great healing –

The Spirit of the Sovereign Lord is on me, because the Lord has anointed me to proclaim good news to the poor.  He has sent me to bind up the brokenhearted, to proclaim freedom for the captives and release from darkness for the prisoners, to proclaim the year of the Lord’s favour and the day of vengeance of our God, to comfort all who mourn, and provide for those who grieve in Zion – to bestow on them a crown of beauty instead of ashes, the oil of joy instead of mourning, and a garment of praise instead of a spirit of despair.  They will be called oaks of righteousness, a planting of the Lord for the display of his splendour.  Isaiah 61:1-3 (NIV)

Sand art design with the kangaroo totem

My prayer is that our Heavenly Father will show us how to honour our Aboriginal brothers and sisters so that together we can rejoice in the healing and the coming together of the Body of Christ.
Interested in finding out more
about the Australian Indigenous Class, click here

Alternatively, watch the video below of Sarah (Gordon College) and Alex (Wheaton College), ASC students from Spring 2018 share about their experience about the Australian Indigenous Worldview class (CS254).

Life as a business intern

Meet Fall 2018 student Kaitlyn Milano from Eastern University. Kaitlyn, completed a Business Internship at Surf Life Saving Queensland – SLSQ is Queensland’s peak aquatic rescue authority and is one of the largest volunteer-based community service organisations in Australia.  Hear Kait reflect on her experiences and the connections she acquired between knowledge at SLSQ and her internship role.

“The business internship has helped me towards my future career in building skills that I can apply to any job…” Kaitlyn Milano, Eastern University, Fall 2018

There are currently business internships  in the following fields: Accounting, Business Administration, Marketing and Management. Internship applications open 1 October for Spring 2019 and 1 April for Fall 2019.

Find out more here!

Fill out the Information Request Form below so we can contact you about internships.

My Student Representative Council Experience

This blog is written by Chelsey Girvin. Chelsey, is a Fall 2018 student from Waynesburg University. Editor’s note: This post has been edited.

My name is Chelsey Girvin. I am a Biology/Pre-Veterinary Major from Waynesburg University in the United States. I was given the opportunity this year to study abroad at Christian Heritage College and be part of the student representative council on campus. My responsibilities and obligations on the council included the following: attending all meetings as a full speaking and voting member – providing input into decisions that affect international students and the wider student body.

CHC Student Representative Council, 2018. I am  third from the  right (next to the President in the hat).

Don’t just read about Chelsea’s experience.  Live it! 
Apply now!

Need more information?  Talk to our admissions counselor.

I also participated in various community events such as lunch hangs (lunch time community hang outs – where I would help prepare meals which brought the students together). There was also campus chapel, where I was a greeter. One event was the CHC Ball, I assisted with the table arrangements and decorations of the venue so students and staff could enjoy themselves.

Suave!

Post Suave

One thing I’ve learnt while serving as a representative included interpersonal skills. Through my SRC experience, I strongly believed I developed better relationships towards people in terms of gratitude, communication, friendliness, and optimism. This along with other experiences are essential in any community environment.

One challenge I faced, was exercising my leadership skills. I challenged myself by clearing my mindset, stepping back, and allowing everyone in the council to deliver their individual responsibilities and empowerment. This had a positive effect on me, as I was able to make decisions towards a shared vision.

 We did it!

We did it!

Overall, my involvement in the SRC has given me the opportunity to improve personally, build relationships with people, serve the community and represent students on a personal level which benefited them.

Fill out the Information Request Form so we can contact you!

Kangaroos, red dirt, and scorching sun…I knew I wanted to be a part of this adventure!

This blog is written by Ariel Norris. Ariel, is a Fall 2018 student from North Greenville College. Editor’s note: This post has been lightly edited.

Last semester, when I was deciding where I wanted to study abroad, the fact that ASC offered a trip to the Australian outback was a major draw card for me. Instantly images of kangaroos, red dirt, and scorching sun came to mind and I knew I wanted to be a part of this adventure.

Girl with whip

Having a whip crackin of a time!

Fast forward a few months, I find myself waking at 4am, jumping onto a bus (not entirely sure what direction we were heading) and onto the dusty roads towards the Outback! Though the ASC staff did inform us of what we should basically expect from the trip, I don’t think any of us truly knew what we were getting into.

Girl on dusty road

On the dusty red dirt roads

We were told, sleeping arrangements may include sleeping under the stars or in an old barn! To which a mixture of responses came from my fellow classmates! I, for one was thrilled at the prospect of falling asleep beneath a million stars. Others weren’t too sure.

Understandably, the nerves were not about sleeping in the Outback but more who or what they may be sleeping with? I will admit, the idea of waking up to see a king brown (snake) curled up next to me, or a kangaroo looking down at me did cross my mind once or twice. Thankfully, never once did I wake to find anything except the ranch’s dogs, Marley and Devil, snuggled up next to our group!

Outback sleeping arrangements

Outback sleeping arrangements

In addition to nerves about the sleeping arrangements, we are invited by the ASC staff partake in a “no shower challenge” to understand what drought stricken farmers constantly battle. I decided I would “Go Hard or Go Home!” with this challenge.

You see, it would be easy to come on the Outback trip with the mindset of “we have to do this.” But the experience becomes so much more enriching when we change our mindset from “have to” to “get to”.

Jessica Gurrola (Biola University) and Abby Haas (Montreat  College) making a new friend

Having a good feed

We heard from the ranch owners on how they didn’t choose this lifestyle because of  financial gain but chose it because the Outback is part of who they are.

Me and Lyle the ranch owner

Me and Lyle the ranch owner

Upon reflection, I left behind familiarity of the modern life and jumped into a new reality that I would never have been able to experience outside of the ASC program. We weren’t just in the Outback to have a good time. We were there to learn how challenging life can be in this arid sometimes “unforgiving” land.

Lyle the ranch owner talking about a particular tree local to the area

Lyle, talking about the landscape

The Outback is harsh, yet it is also full of life and richness if you allow yourself to see it. As I returned home to Brisbane, and gazed across the backyard (bursting with green grass and trees) I realized that even though it wasn’t easy experience, I did it! We did it! Our time spent there, I will never forget!

Desert flower

 

PS. Showering never felt better!

Stradbroke Memories

This blog is written by Sarah Reed. It comes from her personal blog “Sarah Reed Down Under“. Sarah is a Fall 2018 student from Messiah College. Editor’s note: This post was first published on the 13th of August, 2018 and has been lightly edited.

A few weekends ago my classmates and I traveled across Moreton Bay to Stradbroke Island for a weekend with our Indigenous worldviews class. The ferry ride was short yet relaxing and upon arrival we were welcomed with a smoking ceremony to cleanse ourselves.

Stradbroke Ferry

Having fun on the ferry on the way to Stradbroke

The morning continued with our ears being filled with stories about local customs of the Indigenous people of the area.  This was followed by dancing, boomerang and spear throwing! Which was really fun!

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Boomerang throwing

See videos of my boomerang throwing and spear throwing activities.

The day finished with a brisk Gorge walk. The scenic trail snaked around cliffs and we were fortunate enough to see whales jumping out of the ocean, sea turtles and other wildlife.

A view from the Gorge walk

The next day, we worked with artist Craig to create sand art on the beach. Each design unique in their expression!

People on beach creating sand art

Working on sand art designs

This was followed by a time of worship at Brown Lake (a historical site where local Indigenous women would bring with their children).

Musicians playing guitars and ukulele at Brown Lake

Worship time at Brown Lake

Now I know this sounds like a nice weekend getaway, but it was much more than that.  Before coming to Australia, I thought Indigenous people were just an ancient group of people that used to live in Australia, little did I know that I was very wrong.  The weekend showed me, this ancient culture is still every much alive! The elders of the community, shared with us the importance of country and showed us ways to utilize plants and the things on the island. We were invited onto sacred grounds which were had been frequented by their ancestors. They also shared with us stories of hardships faced by Aboriginal people today.

Over the weekend, not only did I experience Aboriginal culture and history. I also learnt how an Aboriginal person can be both Christian and still hold on to their cultural values. I have never experienced anything like this and I will forever hold onto the memories I made this weekend.

Using found materials to create sand art

 

 

 

the place that calls my heart

This blog is written by Marissa Showalter. It comes from her personal blog “Riss Lynn Takes Brisbane“. Marissa was a Spring 2017 student from Messiah College. Editor’s note: This post was originally published in August 2017 and has been lightly edited. 

This past week has been a tough one. Every day that passes makes me wish more and more that I was on a plane headed back to the place that calls my heart. There are just too many in completes that I left behind in my sweet Brissy, and I want nothing more than to return to finish what I started under the sweet summer sunshine of Queensland. What do you do when your heart physically aches for somewhere else?

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A Gold Coast Beach

You would think that the more time passes, the more I would settle back into life here. WRONG. Yep. If anything, I feel even more listless than before. People here are talking about taking their GREs and applying to jobs, and I can’t help but feel like a frozen over creek, stagnant and unmoving.

I have been encountering so many well-meaning folks who, upon discovering that it’s my senior year, inquire as most do about what my plans are after college. I fake a smile and start going on about how I plan to go to grad school for counseling. HA. Who am I fooling?? Not that I don’t still feel like counseling is my calling or anything, but now I have bigger dreams and weirdly they look a lot like palm trees swaying on a spotless beaches and kangaroos bouncing across a stretch of barren desert.

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A mob of Kangaroos

People are usually rather incredulous when I tell them that I want to move to Australia. They think I’m joking or being dramatic or just exaggerating the impact that my time there had on me. “You would really want to live over there?” they ask me. “But it’s so far! Wouldn’t you miss your family?”

Then they ask me what I would plan to do when I got there and that’s just the kicker, because once again, I have no idea. Like, not a clue. I could go and work odd jobs for a little while, which no one would understand once I have earned my degree. I could do grad school abroad potentially, but of course I don’t know what that would mean financially as an international student or the implications for becoming a licensed counselor in the US. All I know is that I need to find my way back somehow.

So this has been an especially hard week emotionally as I move yet again into my new apartment. In the move, I packed up all of my Australia mementos and carefully tucked them away to be prominently displayed in my new home. I cling to even the smallest item that claims even a little bit of sentimentality. You know what? I still have the packaging for a necklace that I received over there that should’ve gone in the trash long ago. And yet I continue to cling.

If I come to a conclusion about all of this, I’ll keep you updated.

Until then.

xoxo, Riss

A Night At The Museum

This post is written by our guest blogger Joyce Mok , ASC Student Services Coordinator.

Sometimes you stumble on an event which is so rich, it makes you smile days after it is over. Last week, Roxanne and I had the privilege to attend an “after dark” event at the Queensland Museum. A celebratory event showcasing Aboriginal Peoples and Torres Strait Islanders’ history, heritage and culture. The night featured talented young artists from Digi Youth Arts (creative space for indigenous youth), panel discussions, poetry, weaving, live music, roving performances, visual art and short films.

The night began with a moving ceremony, welcoming us (guests to this land) through song and dance.

Welcome to country

A Welcome to Country ceremony

With Welcome to Country over, we wandered the rest of this treasure trove of all things old and large. There was a room full of dinosaur bones, beetles and an assortment of deep sea creatures you only hear about in Jules Verne stories! I was in awe of the creative Creator who made these diverse beings.

With access to rooms and exhibits, we stumble upon a young performer. Motivated by her Aboriginal and Jamaican heritage, Aurora  Liddle-Christie uses her art as a platform to explore the experiences of people of colour within Australian society. Her poetry strong, bold, engaging!

As we weave past artifacts and gigantic termite mounds, it was only natural we end our night expanding our skills in weaving. Practiced by both Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders, each cultural group uses particular materials, techniques, patterns, colours and design based on the plants found in region.  Children are taught at an early age to make baskets for collecting food, nets of fishing and even toys.

Weaving workshop with Torres Strait Islander

Weaving workshop Torres Strait Islander style

I (and Roxanne) certainly enjoyed our night out at the Queensland Museum and look forward in the coming months in sharing experiences like these with the ASCers.

Oh, How Time Flies

Excerpt from Vicki Crocker’s personal blog “Heights and Depth”. Vicki is a Fall 2017 student from Roberts Wesleyan College. Reproduced with permission.

I can’t believe it’s already been 7 weeks since I’ve first arrived in this beautiful country. I have been able to experience many things and meet many people. One of the coolest things I’ve found about Australia is the diversity of culture. For example, the other night, out of a group of 11 people, 8 different countries were represented. I thought it was pretty cool to know people across the country, but to know people from around the world just seems to make it that much smaller.

I’ve also learned that a majority of the school work here is writing papers and not having and tests or exams. Through this, I often find myself starting and finishing a paper in one day, partially because of procrastination through Zumba and other workout videos on YouTube with my host sister, but also because of my stronger desire to get the Australian experience.

With the multiple papers and piling up stress of school, I’ve felt surprisingly calm. The busier the semester gets, the more I realize how busy my schedule gets with planning when to write which paper, planning this trip, and still figuring time to do spontaneous things. With time becoming more and more scarce, I’ve felt the need to sacrifice spending more time on a paper to go and experience some Australian thing with friends. This is something that I feel slightly convicted about because I want to do well in my classes, but I’m here to experience all that I can of Australia.

However, this is quite the least of my worries because I feel the main reason my journey lead me to come here is to grow in Christ in a new way, and that is my ultimate goal of the semester. I would love to get an amazing grade and experience everything I can in my limited time here, but I believe that the reason I don’t stress over these things is because they aren’t the main reason I’m here, which I am very thankful for.

Busyness

Excerpt from Ashley Legget’s personal blog “Dear Australia“  Ashley is a spring 2015 ASC student from Messiah College. Reproduced with permission.

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This is just one of the many beautiful views along the Gorge walk on Straddie Island.

There is way more then I can fit into a blog post to write about, so be prepared to read a novel here, arranged by bullet points:

1.) The main focus of my time in Australia is learning about the modern culture and Aboriginal culture, which has sparked a deeper passion in me for equality. For the American’s who don’t quite understand, Aboriginals are like the Native Americans of Australia, so technically the “Native Australians.” They inhabited the land, and were forced out and abused in many different ways. The thing that makes this class so close to my heart is having a true Aboriginal teacher who spends a lot of her time teaching us about her culture and the close to home problems that they faced and are still facing today. Aboriginals still do not receive the recognition, love, and rights that they deserve as the rightful “owners” of the land. Aside from seeing the true heart of Lea and experiencing a deep passion for her people, this has really sparked a general passion for equality of minorities. Whether they are separated by religious views, culture, language, sexual orientation, or enslaved by anything such as human trafficking… or really anything else, everyone deserves the same rights, respect, and a chance at life the way they decide to live. It breaks my heart to hear the stories of the oppressed.

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This is from the Art Museum a few weeks ago, but it’s taken on a whole new meaning as I continue to understand the Aboriginal culture more and more.

2.) Second, my internship is going so well. I work about 15 hours a week overall at Citipointe, doing a variety of things from administrative work, making phone calls, organizing information, connecting with youth, running a cafe, and many other random jobs. I am really getting a chance to see a whole different youth culture. It’s a large church, VERY pentecostal/charismatic, has a large body of volunteers and about 30 full time workers. I am learning a lot about myself and youth ministry. I must admit though, as I have before, I LOVE my small church and the community around a small church.

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The band is amazing, and extremely well known throughout Australia. This is the main youth event that is put on on Friday.

3.) I finished my first big assignment on the Background of the New Testament if anyone is interested in that topic… it was hard.

4.) I spent this past weekend at North Stradbroke Island, which is mainly an Aboriginal culture. We attended an opening ceremony, which included celebrate the 21st birthday of the elders! I heard many great speakers with beautiful hearts and passions for Aboriginal culture. We did so much to learn more about the culture! We each got to attend a few workshops, which included sand art (not the kind in the bottle), basket weaving (we made bracelets), spear and boomerang throwing, and Aboriginal art. Personally, I learned how to throw a spear and I made 2 keychains in the weaving workshop; it’s the same technique, you just wrap it into a circle and make a basket instead of just a small straight line! We kind of got stormed out of there, so we headed to our camp to unpack and get settled in before we headed off to an Aboriginal weapon and artifact lesson from an Aboriginal! We learned how they made all of their different weapons and learned some crazy hunting methods. We also got our faces painted like a sting ray I believe, and learned some awesome dances and took some crazy pictures (not on my camera, so check back in another time to see them!) The next day we traveled around and got to see some cool landmarks. First we saw a Midden, which is one way Aboriginals can prove how many years they have occupied a land. The midden just looked like a large hill covered in grass, but if you were to cut the hill in half you would see many layers of shells, bones, and other things that they threw in a “trash pile.” It was really cool to see the bottom layer of that! After that we went to Point Lookout, which is the most beautiful beach/gorge walk ever. There’s many pictures (thanks to the other people in my class and myself) of the view, so check them out in the Photograph tab. Then we went to Brown Lake, which is classified as “Women’s Business” where women prepared for ceremonies and gave birth. This is a sacred place. It’s called Brown lake because it’s surrounded by tea tree’s which have died the water brown and “contaminated” it with tea tree oil, which actually made the water soft and great for your skin!

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This is our Aboriginal professor Lea showing us the bottom of the Midden. The Midden is where the Aboriginal people used to throw shells, bones, etc. If you cut the hill behind her in half, you’ll see hundreds of layers, proving how long they have been on that island.

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This was the opening ceremony during the dance segment!

THE CRAZIEST THING: They drive the car ONTO the Ferry! There were like 3 coach busses and A LOT of cars on that Ferry… that made me very very nervous, but it was a beautiful boat ride to the island and back!

5.) I had a bit of a fall… and this is quite the funny story looking back on it now. I was sitting getting ready for Internship with a few friends at Rivers Cafe, which is the cafe attached to the church I am working at. The seating area is up on a platform, which you can walk up 4 or 5 steps on either side to get to. I was sitting with my back to a set of stairs when one leg of my chair when over the edge and I fell (over a matter of 5 seconds) on the chair down the stairs onto the very hard turf ground. I got entangled in the chair and now have a crazy bruise to prove for it!

6.) Australians love American accents, think were all fat and eat unhealthy, and basically every stereotype you can think of America that is negative.

7.) That is all I can think of. In general I spend a lot of time with Dana at my internship, which has been so lovely working with her. In my off time, I go out to eat with friends and take naps… but don’t worry.. I don’t typically have free time, so I am soaking up every ounce of this time.